Program

CRHNet 2017 Symposium Call for Presentations is open now until June 30th, 2017.

Themed Building Resilience: From Catastrophe to Capacity, the Symposium consists of three days of presentations, panel discussions, poster demonstrations and exhibits from industry organizations. Each morning begins with plenary sessions hosting a Keynote speaker on various topics of national and international importance for disaster risk deduction initiatives. Following the plenary sessions, attendees will break-out into three to four concurrent thematic sessions facilitating attendees breaking off into specific industry focuses.

CRHNet will also consider workshops or field trip proposals for Friday afternoon and the three days following the Symposium, and welcome submissions to this end.

The Symposium will be hosted in Halifax October 25-27th following Public Safety Canada’s Roundtable of the Canadian Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction. With over 200 attendees expected over the three days, your involvement as a presenter - sharing your knowledge, experience and efforts will support the CRHNet community to find local and international solutions to common local and global challenges to benefit us as a global community. This year's program will continue to review and discuss the history of hazard characterisation and disaster risk reduction with a key to creating a vision for the future. It will include plenary and themed sessions; presentations; panel discussions; and, poster presentations. It will appeal to people from all disciplines and sectors.

Technical program inquiries should be directed to the program chairs Kevin Quigley and Michel Doré and inquiries regarding workshop proposals should be directed to Marion Boon.

Thanks for your interest and participation in CRHNet’s Annual Symposium. Through information sharing, we can make great strides in increasing resiliency and industry growth both nationally and globally.

For more information on the Symposium visit CRHNet 2017 Annual Symposium

Table of Contents

  • Targeted Poster Session
  • General Sessions
  • Panel Discussions
  • Workshops

  • Thematic Sessions

    TS01: 100 Years Later - Revisiting the Halifax Explosion
    Co-chairs: David Etkin1 and Ian Burton2

    This is an appropriate time to revisit the 1917 Halifax Explosion, since it is the centennial anniversary of this event. One study of the explosion, by Samuel Prince, is widely acknowledged as the first disaster study based in the social sciences, and for that reason the disaster is of particular historical importance. The first part of the session will consist of presentations and the second part will be an open discussion with the audience on topics of interest, based upon the material presented and audience perspectives. Following the conference we hope to have the panelists submit their papers for publication in a journal.

    1 York University, Disaster and Emergency Management Program
    2 Independent Researcher

    Table of contents

     

    TS02: Citizen and volunteers contributions to DRR
    Co-chairs: Michel C. Doré1

    The policy dimensions and capacity for integration of citizen and volunteer contributions into emergency management and disaster risk reduction program design.

    1. Montreal, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    TS03: Disaster and Emergency Management in Higher Education - Content and Pedagogy
    Co-chairs: J. Slick1 and D. Etkin2

    This session will explore issues relating to content and pedagogy in DEM higher education program. The intention is to give space for discussions about the development of DEM as a field of study for those who are teaching or who have an interest in teaching in the field.

    1. Royal Roads University, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada
    2. York University, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    TS04: Domestic Animals and Disaster Response
    Co-chairs: L.Davis1 and R. McConnell1

    The impact and role of domestic animals is often overlooked during disaster response, even though it plays an integral part of the overall result. Pets and livestock are a huge part of our lives and must be factored into any emergency plan. The social, emotional and financial repercussions can have immediate as well as long-lasting effects on individuals and society as a whole. This session will look at existing response capabilities, along with new initiatives Constructive discussion and idea sharing will be encouraged to help improve our programs and partnerships world-wide. Being implemented to minimize the physical and mental stresses caused by disasters on pet and livestock owners. It will show the changing attitudes of emergency response organizations and government agencies, along with the burgeoning desire of people to be part of the solution. As a result, these programs will not only save countless animals, but also lessen the stress levels of evacuees and other impacted people, as well as first responders and those dealing with them in shelters and evacuation centres.

    1. Canadian Disaster Animal Response Team SE British Columbia, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    TS05: Implementing Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction in Provincial Emergency Management Frameworks
    Chair: Trish McOrmond1

    The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction defines the whole-of-society approach for identifying and analysing hazard risks to reduce vulnerability to disasters. The responsibility for reducing disaster risk is shared among emergency management partners, including federal and provincial governments, local authorities, academic community, and industry. In Canada, the federal government leads the national platform for disaster risk reduction, but provincial governments are autonomous in developing their approach to emergency management. The Alberta Emergency Management Agency (AEMA) provides strategic policy direction and leadership in emergency management to the Government of Alberta. Emergency management is undergoing a transformation in Alberta, as seen by: a shift from a whole-of- government approach to a whole-of-society approach and an increased focus on disaster risk reduction, preparedness, and mitigation. This transformation, however, is not deliberate. Rather, increasing complexities in responding to and recovering from extraordinary disasters have inadvertently resulted in growing alignment between the strategic policy direction of Alberta’s emergency management and public safety systems and the Sendai Framework. This transformation presents a unique opportunity to align the province’s strategic goals and operational strategies with the Sendai Framework. This presentation would demonstrate how the Sendai Framework can guide business planning practices of AEMA for developing operational strategies that promote safer, disaster-resilient communities.

    1. Alberta Emergency Management Agency, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    TS06: Legal dimensions of DRR
    Co-chairs: Henry Dakura1 and Trish McOrmond1

    2015 marked a significant milestone in developing comprehensive frameworks for sustainable development and disaster risk reduction. World leaders adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at its core. The Paris Climate Agreement (COP21) and the Sendai Framework were also adopted. The SDGs represents a commitment to eradicate poverty and set targets for sustainable development by 2030. It integrates the three aspect of sustainable development: - economic, social, and environmental. The 17 SDGs and their 169 associated targets are global in nature, universally applicable, and interlinked. The 2015 Paris Agreement is a significant landmark in the collective action against climate change and a confirmation of the path to a low-carbon and climate resilient global economy. Disaster risk reduction, sustainable development, and climate change are not mutually exclusive issues.

    1. Alberta Emergency Management Agency, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    TS07: Measuring Disaster Risk Reduction Achievement in Canada
    Chair: Suzanne Waldman1

    Measuring Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) program achievements is a complex problem. This complexity derives from a number of features of disasters, including their uncertain time frame, which challenges testing the effectiveness and appropriateness of DRR strategies, programs, and program implementations. Other sources of complexity include the diverse types of interventions grouped in the category of DRR and the difficulty of extracting evidence of effective DRR from disaster data, given large and significant confounding variables, particularly in the area of economic losses. This session will present an overview of the literature on these challenges, consider unique difficulties in measuring DRR achievements in the Canadian context, and provide some recommendations.

    1. Defense Research and Development Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    TS08: Youth Engagement
    Co-chairs: Robin Cox1 and Michel Unger1

    There is a growing acknowledgement in research and policy of the need to focus on improving our understanding and engagement of children and youth as we grapple with the urgent need to reduce disaster risks and costs and enhance the resilience of communities and society. The research in this area has identified children and youth as some of the most vulnerable populations in disasters, but it also highlighting their potential to contribute to, and lead, DRR and resilience efforts in their communities. This session highlights recent and ongoing research and policy initiatives that focus on youth, disasters and climate change. Presenters will highlight participatory research, policy initiatives, and programs, Canadian and international, that illuminate and feature the perspectives and voices of youth affected by disasters and climate change. Through presentations and conversation, this session will draw on our collective knowledge and expertise to explore not only the impacts of disasters on young people and their specific vulnerabilities and capacities, but also the ways in which young people are contributing to disaster risk reduction and resilience in their communities.

    SPONSORS: ResilienceByDesign Research Innovation Lab

    1. ResilienceByDesign Research Innovation Lab, Royal Roads University, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    TS09: Building Indigenous Resilience
    Co-chairs: David Diabo1 and Brenda Murphy2

    This stream focuses on highlighting successful case studies and approaches that build disaster resilience in First Nation, Metis and Inuit communities. Resilience is often defined as being about building on current strengths and effectively managing all types of change, including disasters. Success story themes may include (but are not limited to):

    • Development of new emergency management planning strategies
    • Engagement of community members, especially Elders and youths, and the use and inclusion of Traditional Knowledge
    • Identification of hazards and/or vulnerabilities
    • Development of disaster risk reduction strategies
    Please contact the chairs to discuss your inclusion in this stream.

    1. Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

    2. Wilfrid Laurier University, London, Ontario, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    Poster Session

    PS01: Integrated solutions for Managing and Using Disaster Information - Theory, Technology and Practice
    Co-chairs: J.P. Yan1, J.H. Wen1, and D.S. Gu1

    Disaster information, in particular, instant disaster information, is highly critical to decision making for effective disaster/emergency response. However, how to integrate disaster-related data from multiple sources in a timely manner, visualize disaster situation in an understandable way, and report disaster situations in a user-specific format, remains a challenge. This poster is to present three ways of creating disaster information databases and its integrating mechanism. On this basis, an National Disaster Observatory (NDOTM), is introduced as an integrated platform solution for managing and using disaster information, which are featured with key functionalities, i.e. disaster registration, disaster monitoring and analysis, damage and loss accounting, and disaster situation visualization and rapid reporting. Initiated by the Global Risk Identification Programme (GRIP) of United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), NDO has been developed to: 1) promote cross-sectoral sharing and coordinated management of disaster information to strengthen synergy among different authorities during emergencies and disasters; 3) provide timely, all-dimensional information services for real-time disaster monitoring and decision making in disaster response; 3) provide integrated risk assessment and governance with solid data and knowledge by in-depth forensic analysis of historic disasters. The poster will showcase NDO practice in developing countries as well.

    SPONSOR: Rodel Risk Solutions

    1. Rodel Risk Solutions, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    General Sessions

    GS01: Health sciences or services:
    Chair: CRHNet1

    Includes the psychosocial dimensions of mitigation, emergency management, and pandemic management

    SPONSOR: Canadian Risk and Hazards Network

    1. Canadian Risk and Hazards Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    GS02: Natural sciences:
    Chair: CRHNet1

    Includes risk assessment and risk modeling methods, and risk mitigation strategies

    SPONSOR: Canadian Risk and Hazards Network

    1. Canadian Risk and Hazards Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    GS03: Social sciences and services:
    Chair: CRHNet1

    Includes the psychosocial dimensions of mitigation, emergency management, and pandemic management.

    SPONSOR: Canadian Risk and Hazards Network

    1. Canadian Risk and Hazards Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    GS04: Industry and commerce:
    Cohair: CRHNet1

    Includes industrial resilience, enterprise risk management, risk and insurance management, business continuity and security.

    SPONSOR: Canadian Risk and Hazards Network

    1. Canadian Risk and Hazards Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    Panel Discussions

    PNL01: Coastal City Threats: Get outta here !!
    Chair: Kevin Quigley1

    Getting out-of-here is easier said than done!  Halifax’s unique geography makes our population extra vulnerable to coastal threats.  There is a population concentration on the peninsula, choke points galore, critical bridge connections subject to failure, and then there are the drivers !!!  Research on evacuation plans, the impact of disruptions, traffic routing options, and critical infrastructure outages (i.e. the bridge), can help the public with personal planning, inform businesses on adaptable responses to large scale transportation disruptions, and guide improved emergency response. This panel will draw from two research projects: (1) evacuation of the peninsula and (2) the MacDonald bridge redecking project.

    1. Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    PNL02: Coastal City Threats: How vulnerable we are!
    Chair: Ron Pelot1 Climate change phenomena can be especially harsh on coastal cities, as extreme weather, sea level rise, and storm surges assault our communities to varying degrees.  The effectiveness of emergency preparedness and response relies on improved prediction and communication of the range of threats. Researchers in the MEOPAR Research Network, including many from Dalhousie University, are advancing models for forecasting, risk communication and visualization, to help decision-makers deal with such threats. This panel will provide an overview of new techniques and tools, with applications to the Atlantic Region.

    1. Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    PNL03: Insurer Role in Disaster Preparedness, Response and Recovery
    Chair: David McGown1 A panel will discuss the role that insurers play across the 4 pillars of disaster risk reduction with particular emphasis on their role as "second responders" following a catastrophic event. Risk Assessment underpins preparedness plans and Insurance Bureau of Canada is a pioneer in developing national flood risk mapping. Flood mapping allows insurers to assess flood risk and insurers have recently developed new overland flood insurance products for Canadians. Financial risk transfer is an important component of national and community preparedness, creating more resilient communities that are better able to recover from a disaster. By taking financial risk away from governments insurers allow governments to redirect tax dollars. Insurers are key players in the recovery process, acting as second responders. They arrive immediately after a disaster with cheques in hand to help their customers get through those first tough days. And in large-scale events, insurers work closely with their policyholders and government stakeholders for months and even years.

    1. Insurance Bureau of Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    Workshops

    WS01: Disaster Law - Implications for Practice
    Chair: Lise Anne Pierce1

    The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies’ International Disaster Law (IDL) guidelines address implications for DRR and disaster response and have been implemented in many countries. Canada, both internationally and domestically, recognizes the importance of understanding international implications during disasters. This session will further the discussion by presenting the findings of its first Canadian IDL workshop and will explore Canadian needs and capacities when considering disaster contexts that require cross boundary / cross border and international coordination. The Red Cross experiences, domestically and internationally, will set the stage for a participatory approach to understanding IDL guidelines to addressing legal constraints that affect humanitarian response. The scenario for the Alberta Government’s EMX 17 exercise was a simulated 9.0 Cascadia earthquake impacting B.C.’s Lower Mainland and tested the Alberta Emergency Management Agency B.C. Earthquake Plan and the memorandum of understanding with the Government of British Columbia. The exercise revealed unanticipated legal hurdles with regards to coordinating an emergency response outside of the provincial boundaries. There are barriers to declaring a state of emergency, the processes for determining and delivering goods and services to impacted areas, procurement for an out-of-province emergency, and the limitations of current agreements, which envisioned an active Government of Alberta response in the immediate onset of a catastrophic event.

    SPONSOR: The Canadian Red Cross (CRC) and the IFRC (International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies)

    1. Red Cross Canada, British Columbia, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    WS02: The Indigenous Peoples' contributions to DRR
    Co-chairs: Simon Lambert1 and Sarah Burke2

    This session will look at the importance of incorporating Indigenous knowledge and empowering Indigenous communities for disaster risk reduction (DRR) as well as the experience of Indigenous Peoples engagement in DRR and community response.

    1. University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada
    2. Canadian Red Cross, British Columbia, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    WS03: Tools for Building Community Resilience and Capacity
    Co-chairs: Eddie Oldfield1 and Christy Arseneau2

    Improving resiliency can help reduce costs which may result from extreme weather, climate change impacts and natural disasters. Municipalities can improve resiliency through understanding the hazards, risk assessment, emergency plan / preparedness, better building or land use planning decisions, investing in climate resilient infrastructure, public education, to name a few. A hands-on mapping exercise will enable the application of resiliency assessment, climate impacts adaptation, disaster risk reduction, and emergency preparedness principles. The National Risk Atlas, developed based on two comprehensive exercises: National Stocktaking of Risk Information (NSRI) and National Risk Assessment (NRA) provides a decision-making perspective. What are the issues and challenges in fostering Risk-information Decision Making in developing countries and a road map to develop a National Risk Atlas.

    SPONSOR: Spatial Quest

    1. Spatial Quest, Fredricton, New Brunswick, Canada
    2. Wanigan consulting, Fredricton, New Brunswick, Canada

    Table of contents

     

    WS04: Supporting community psychosocial recovery – cross sector approach
    Co-chairs: Sarah Sargent1 and Alison Paul1

    Emergencies and disasters exacerbate a range of issues impacting individual, family and community well-being and resilience. These events erode normally protective supports, may increase risks, amplify pre-existing problems and complicate access to support structures and services. Therefore, a priority in disaster and emergency response is to protect and support community resilience and wellbeing across sectors. Integrated psychosocial supports and programming that place affected communities at the centre requires strong cross-sector coordinated action. Efforts to address the immediate psychosocial needs of the affected populations, including unique considerations for particularly vulnerable groups, as well as to build community capacity and resilience to future disasters are critical. This session will explore the important contributions of cross-sector coordination in support of community psychosocial recovery in Alberta following the wildfires in 2016.

    SPONSOR: The Canadian Red Cross (CRC) and the IFRC (International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies)

    1. Red Cross Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

    Table of contents